The Edition

Categories

12.13.17

“Collect work that means something to you. Find work that resonates in your soul, that echoes your spark and feels like an extension of yourself. It will always speak to a part of you.”  We asked Ellen Sherman about artist and collector misconceptions, finding inspiration in video games, and how she has connected with collectors in the far corners of the globe.

E.H. Sherman in her studio with Vinyasa II    11×14 | Edition of 10 | $100

My favorite medium is:  Acrylics, diluted to the point they resemble watercolor.

I started creating in:  I began painting as soon as I could hold a brush, completed my BFA in Studio Art at Michigan State University and have been creating professionally since 2010.

I am a full time / part-time artist: Full time.

A common misconception about contemporary artists is:  I think a lot of people still tend to relate contemporary artists to the ‘starving artist’ model of days past. While it’s not an easy career choice by any means, we have never had so much potential for reach and growth than we do in this digital age. With a few taps on a screen and clicks of a mouse we can find and connect with people who enjoy our work and want to have it in their space. It’s an amazing time to be an artist.

The most surprising thing I’ve discovered about collectors is: I assumed that most collectors would be in New York, LA or London. It is amazing to learn where my pieces are headed – the ability to see/purchase/ship work across the globe is incredible.

My most unorthodox source of inspiration is:  I find most of my inspiration in being outside surrounded by scenery that moves me and stirs me to create. Occasionally, I’ll feel that same spark of inspiration when inside a video game surrounded by graphics that mimic that same feeling of awe. Overlapping textures, fog effects, atmospheric music – these aren’t part of the ‘natural’ world, but I still find inspiration in their midst.

The one piece of advice I would give people who want to start collecting art is:  Collect work that means something to you. Find work that resonates in your soul, that echoes your spark and feels like an extension of yourself. It will always speak to a part of you.

A few more questions.  Living or dead…

…what artist would you follow on Instagram? Georgia O’Keefe and Mark Rothko.

Mark Rothko in front of “No.7”, 1960

…what artist would you most like to have drinks with?  I’d like to have drinks with Helen Frankenthaler. We share a birthday and I’ve always been enamored with her work. I’d love to meet for drinks – but maybe not even talk about art, just talk about what she did that day or what she plans to do tomorrow. To sit and and bask in the glow of her genius in an everyday setting would be amazing.

Browse Sherman’s work here!


No Comments

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

19 − 2 =